RSS Twitter YouTube

Lightroom Architectural Photography

Getting The Most

By Jane Grates

Working on topics that demand a specific focus while containing a great amount of detail can be a challenging task, but the topic of Architectural Photography adds a whole new dimension to this category.

One of the most misguided assumptions we encounter regarding Architectural Photography is the belief that anybody with a good DSLR camera can take good architectural-themed photographs. That is nowhere near accurate, not to mention that it is disrespectful to those who dedicate their time and passion to creating amazing architectural photos.

In order to succeed in this endeavor, you should first have a considerable amount of knowledge under your belt regarding composition rules, lighting conditions… and even the history of architecture, so you will be aware of the style of the building you are shooting, as well as recognize the main features of interest that will catch the attention of your audience right off the bat.

Assuming that you already have that part down, now it is time to enhance the fruits of your labor by using the amazing post-production software that is Adobe Lightroom.

Primary Adjustments

For architectural photography, the first thing I tend to do is make an adjustment by going all the way down the panels of tools provided by the Develop module and locating the area where it says Lens Corrections.

Next, we will move to the Manual area and compensate for the distortions that may have been caused by your camera lens.

Now, we move back to basic, and where it says Upright we have to select Vertical in order to adjust the position of your image plane to the vertical edge.

Now, we go to the Basic panel and locate the area where we can adjust White Balance. As you can see, there are three possible outcomes of this tool:

  1. Via the presets made by Lightroom where it displays As Shot – Only available for RAW files.
  2. Via Temp/Tint sliders – Universal method.
  3. Via Dropper tool – Sampling at an area of equal R, G, B values, which stands for neutral gray.

I am going to work with the second method by making the image look a bit warmer in general.

Increase contrast for this image the very same way I am doing it here.

Then move to the display for adjustments to be made on different parts of the Histogram. As you can see, the Highlights in the image look far too intense, especially in those areas where the sunlight seems to be stronger. Reduce those values to almost -100, and reduce a great deal of the values for Whites as well.

Increase the Blacks by moving the slider towards the negative values, as this will enhance the atmosphere in this image.

Neocamera Blog is a medium for expressing ideas related to digital cameras and photography. Read about digital cameras in the context of technology, media, art and the world. Latest posts links:

Camera Bag

Clear

Your camera bag is empty. To add a camera or lens click on the star next to its name.

Your camera bag is empty.

Add cameras or lenses by clicking on the star next to their name.

Updates

    2018.01.15

  • 2018.01.15

    Nikon D850 Review

    Nikon D850 Review

    Nikon Full-Frame flagship DSLR. 46 Megapixels, ISO 32-102400, 7+ FPS 153-Point AF system and 4K Ultra-HD Video. Professional weatherproof DSLR with dual control-dials and a extra-large 0.75X magnification OVF with 100% coverage and a built-in shutter. Illuminated controls, 3.2" LCD, WiFi and Bluetooth.

  • 2018.01.11

  • 2018.01.11

    Lens Features for B&W Street Photography

    Lens Features for B&W Street Photography

    Important lens features for B&W street photographers.

  • 2017.12.19

  • 2017.12.19

    Key Tips On How To Take Amazing Model Shots For Publication

    Key Tips On How To Take Amazing Model Shots For Publication

    Essential tips for starting portrait photographers to make professional model shots.

  • 2017.12.18

  • 2017.12.18

    Nikon D7500 Review

    Nikon D7500 Review

    In-depth review of the Nikon D7500 professional-grade APS-C DSLR with ISO 50-1638400 range, 8 FPS and 4K Ultra-HD video. Dual control-dials in a weatherproof body. Large 0.94X magnification OVF with Eye-Start Sensor. WiFi and Bluetooth.

  • 2017.12.07

  • 2017.12.07

    Think Tank Photo Spectral 10 Review

    Think Tank Photo Spectral 10 Review

    Review of the Think Thank Photo Spectral 10 photography shoulder bag.

  • 2017.11.29

  • 2017.11.29

    Fujifilm X-T20 Review

    Fujifilm X-T20 Review

    Highly compact mirrorless built around a 24 MP X-Trans CMOS III APS-C sensor and X-Processor Pro capable of 14 FPS drive and 4K Ultlra-HD video. Features dual control-dials and a 2.4 MP 0.39" EVF with 0.62X magnification and an Eye-Start Sensor.

  • 2017.11.23

  • 2017.11.23

    Digital Camera Viewfinder Comparison

    Digital Camera Viewfinder Comparison

    Global comparison of viewfinders from all digital cameras. Optical viewfinders (OVF) and electronic viewfinders (EVF) all in one easy to compare table.

  • 2017.11.10

  • 2017.11.10

    Best Digital Cameras of 2017

    Best Digital Cameras of 2017

    The Best Cameras of 2017 awarded by Neocamera: Best Travel-Zoom, Best Premium Compact, Best Ultra-Zoom, Best Mirrorless (Beginner, Advanced and Professional) and Best DSLR (Entry, Enthusiast and Professional), now including budget choices.

  • 2017.11.07

  • 2017.11.07

    MindShift Photocross 13 Review

    MindShift Photocross 13 Review

    Review of the Mindshift Photocross 13 Sling Bag.

  • 2017.11.01

  • 2017.11.01

    Fujifilm X-E3 Review

    Fujifilm X-E3 Review

    Unique Fujifilm rangefinder-styled mirrorless. 24 MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS III sensor with built-in 325-Point Hybrid AF system and X-Processor Pro. 14 FPS Drive with Electronic-Shutter or 8 FPS with Mechanical Shutter. 4K Ultra-HD Video at 30 FPS. Highly compact body with a builtin 2.4 MP 0.39" LCD with Eye-Start Sensor, 0.62X magnification and 100% coverage and 3" Touchscreen 1 MP LCD plus dual control-dials.