logo
RSS Twitter YouTube

Olympus Stylus 1 Review

12 Megapixels12 MegapixelsUltra-Zoom: At least 10X optical zoom.Ultra-Zoom: At least 10X optical zoom.Electronic View FinderElectronic View FinderHigh ISO: ISO 6400 or more is available at full-resolution.High ISO: ISO 6400 or more is available at full-resolution.Stabilization: Compensates for tiny involuntary movements of the camera.Stabilization: Compensates for tiny involuntary movements of the camera.Level: Measures camera tilt and helps to keep the horizon level.Level: Measures camera tilt and helps to keep the horizon level.Continuous DriveContinuous DriveFull 1080p HD Video: 1920 x 1080 resolution or more.Full 1080p HD Video: 1920 x 1080 resolution or more.Manual Controls: Both fully-manual (M) and semi-automatic modes (T and V).Manual Controls: Both fully-manual (M) and semi-automatic modes (T and V).Custom White-Balance: Specifies exactly what should be white to the camera.Custom White-Balance: Specifies exactly what should be white to the camera.Action Photography: Shutter speeds of 1/1500 or more.Action Photography: Shutter speeds of 1/1500 or more.Night Photography: Reaches shutter-speeds longer than 4 seconds.Night Photography: Reaches shutter-speeds longer than 4 seconds.Hotshoe: Allows external flash units to be attached.Hotshoe: Allows external flash units to be attached.Spot MeteringSpot MeteringAccepts Secure Digital Extended Capacity (SDXC), SDHC and SD memory.Accepts Secure Digital Extended Capacity (SDXC), SDHC and SD memory.Neocamera detailed reviewNeocamera detailed reviewDiscontinued: No longer produced by the manufacturer. May still be in stock or found used.Discontinued: No longer produced by the manufacturer. May still be in stock or found used.

Usability - How easy is it to use?

The Olympus Stylus 1 is a compact camera designed to be operated with two hands. The protruding lens barrel is surrounded by a mechanical ring which serves as the main control-dial. It has a heavily-textured surface and optional detents which produce audible clicks. The left hand should therefore generally support the camera with the thumb and index finger operating the ring. A two-way switch near the base of the camera toggles detents.

The right hand naturally is needed to operate the shutter-release and completes the hold of the camera. There is a small hand-grip to hold the Stylus 1 by. This provides reasonable purchase and makes the index finger fall easily over the shutter-release.

Olympus Stylus 1

The right-hand thumb rests on a textured rubber patch between the Fn1 and Playback buttons. A slight outward curve helps hold the camera securely. The right neck-strap eyelet though is in an uncomfortable position which can dig into the side of your finder while reaching for the shutter-release.

At the center of the control-ring switch, there is an unusual customizable Fn2 button. Instead of being assigned a function, this one cycles between a number of user-selectable settings: Stabilization, Picture Mode, Scene Mode, Art Filter, WB, Drive, Aspect-Ratio, Image Quality, Video Quality, Flash Mode, FC, Metering, AF Mode, ISO, Face-Priority and ND Filter. This is quite a list! Of course, the more functions are assigned, the longer it takes to cycle around. ISO is clearly an essential choice here.

On the other side of the lens barrel, there is a sliding zoom controller. It moves the lens smoothly. There is a choice of slow or normal speed. While the former takes longer, it is more precise. The other zoom controller, wrapped around the shutter-release, always operates at normal speed.

Every part of the Olympus Stylus 1 feels solid, even the battery compartment cover. The camera feels quite solid without being heavy in use, since both hands tend to support it. Most likely due to the bright aperture and long reach of its lens, the barrel is large for a compact camera. Olympus innovated here by supplying a removable lens cover which opens up to let the lens through which leaves little reason to take it off.

Olympuys Stylus 1

Power on and off require a quick press of the power button which is located on the top-plate. A tiny configurable Video-Record button finds itself at the front-right corner of the camera. Next to it, there is a two-stage shutter-release with a soft halfway point. When the camera takes long to focus, it can therefore happen that a picture gets taken accidentally.

There is a large control-dial with good detents next to the shutter-release. It adjusts Exposure-Compensation or Aperture in Manual exposure mode. The dial is unmarked, so keep an eye on EC while shooting.

The built-in EVF occupies a large housing on the top-plate. On top of it, there is a standard hot-shoe. On the other side of the EVF, there is a traditional mode-dial with 10 positions. The usual 4 PASM modes are there, plus two custom modes, an auto mode along with 3 scene positions. The chosen mode affects the functions assigned to each mode dial. In the case of scene modes, some menu options are often blocked as well.

The behavior of control-dials can be customized by mode. One usually sets an exposure-parameter, while the other sets EC or FC. Program-Shift is available in P and some automatic modes. Too bad Olympus did not allow ISO to be controlled by the rear-dial.

Olympus Stylus 1

The back of the camera is dominated by a 3" LCD with 1 megapixel. It is really sharp and has nice contrast. The screen is mounted on a sturdy hinge which lets it tilt vertically. It has a good anti-reflective coating that makes it usable in bright light.

Above the LCD is a large 0.44" EVF with 1.15X magnification. Having 1.44 megapixels, it is extremely sharp and clearly shows focus. It has 100% coverage and it paired with a convenient Eye-Start sensor which automatically switches between the LCD and EVF based on proximity. This usability feature is a must-have!

Both displays have a fast refresh-rate. Color and white-balance are previewed quite well. Sadly, the display is only Exposure-Priority in Manual mode. Otherwise, it shows the metered exposure which is obviously only be correct within the latitude of the camera.

To the right of the display are a number of buttons mostly gathered around the combined 4-way controller and rear control-dial. The one exception is a programmable Fn1 button near the top-edge of the camera. It can be assigned one of 8 functions: AE-L, DOF-Preview, One-Touch WB, Focus-Point Home, Digital Zoom, Converter Settings, ND Filter or Zoom Framing Assist. Most of these are obvious. Converter Settings allow to select which optical converter is mounted on the camera. Framing Assist zooms out temporarily to help frame subjects.

The Playback, Menu and Info button works just as they do one most cameras. Each cardinal point of the 4-way controller is labelled with its default function. The central OK button also invokes photographic controls:

  • OK: Brings up an icon-based quick menu or an interactive control-panel at the last used position. The top control-dial select what to change and the control-ring changes it. This is extremely efficient.
  • Up: Once pressed, vertical buttons change EC ±3 in 1/3 steps and horizontal ones set the current exposure parameter. In Manual mode, the other parameter changes instead of EC.
  • Right: Shows the flash options, the ones that do not apply to the current exposure mode appear greyed-out.
  • Down: Shows drive mode options including bracketing (BKT) and self-timers. The BKT option is usually greyed-out because this one is only a toggle. Bracketing itself must be configured in the camera's menu.
  • Left: Controls focus by first showing the currently active focus-point(s). The rear control-dial or directional buttons can be used to select a single focus point or all of them. At this point the Info button can be pressed to bring up focus-mode options.

For all options activated by the 4-way controller, OK can be pressed to confirm the selection and dismiss the menu. This is not necessary as the selected option is set regardless. The implementation of the directional buttons actually brings up the quick menu at a specific position. So, even though Down activates Drive Mode, the front control-dial can still be used to select other settings to change. When the OK button is pressed to bring up the quick menu, it does so at the last known position even if it was set by one of the directional buttons.

Although the quick menu can be used to change Picture Mode, White-Balance and Image Quality, it cannot be used to configure them. Specifically any adjustments to image parameters such as sharpness, saturation and contrast has to be done through the Super Control-Panel or the menu system. The same is true for WB fine-tuning. Custom white-balance can be set though by pressing the Info button when the Custom White-Balance option is selected.

Olympus Stylus 1

The bottom of the Stylus 1 has a metal tripod mount which is neither inline with the lens nor the center of the camera. It also has a sturdy door which covers the battery and memory-card compartment. The sides of the camera are mostly bare.

Olympus Stylus 1
Buy from these sellers:Buy From Amazon.com
By on 2014/07/24
2

Olympus 1 Facts

Medium digital camera
12 Megapixels Ultra ZoomISO 100-12800
10.7X Wide Optical ZoomShutter 1/2000-60s
Built-in StabilizationFull manual controls, including Manual Focus
0.44" Built-in EVF 1.4 Megapixels (1.15X)Custom white-balance with 2 axis fine-tuning
Automatic Eye-Start sensorSpot-Metering
2 Axis Digital LevelHot-Shoe
7 FPS Drive, 70 ImagesLithium-Ion Battery
1920x1080 @ 30 FPS Video RecordingSecure Digital Extended Capacity
3" LCD 1 Megapixels
Buy from these sellers:Buy From Amazon.com

Camera Bag

Clear

Your camera bag is empty. To add a camera or lens click on the star next to its name.

Updates

    2016.08.25

  • 2016.08.25

    Nikon D5 XQD Review

    Nikon D5 XQD Review

    Nikon flagship professional DSLR with 20 megapixels Full-Frame CMOS sensor. All-new 153-point Phase-Detect AF sensitive to -4 EV. ISO 50 to unprecedented 3,276,800! 12 FPS Drive for 200 JPEGs or 180 RAW. First Nikon DSLR with 4K Ultra HD video.

  • 2016.07.19

  • 2016.07.19

    Olympus Professional Lens Roundup

    Olympus Professional Lens Roundup

    Roundup of Olympus Professional and Premium lenses: M.Zuiko 7-14mm F/2.8 PRO, M.Zuiko 12-40mm F/2.8 PRO, M.Zuiko 40-150mm F/2.8 PRO, M.Zuiko 12mm F/2, M.Zuiko 60mm F/2.8 Macro.

  • 2016.07.07

  • 2016.07.07

    Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II Review

    Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II Review

    Olympus second generation base OM-D with an anti-alias-filter-free 16 MP Four-Thirds CMOS sensor mounted on a 5-axis in-body stabilization system. Speedy 8.5 FPS drive, full HD @ 60 FPS and a wealth of features in a compact and lightweight body. Offers a 2.4 MP 0.45" EVF with 0.62X magnification and 100% coverage, plus dual control-dials and a highly customizable interface.

  • 2016.05.11

  • 2016.05.11

    Fuji X-Pro2 Review

    Fuji X-Pro2 Review

    Fuji flagship XF-mount mirrorless with 24 MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS III sensor. 273-Point AF with 169 Phase-Detect points. 8 FPS Drive, 1080p video. Dual control-dials, direct dials and a hybrid viewfinder in a weather-sealed freezeproof body.

  • 2016.04.21

  • 2016.04.21

    Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS100 Review

    Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS100 Review

    The only premium travel-zoom! 20 megapixels 1" high-speed CMOS sensor paired with a stabilized 25-250mm F/2.8-5.9 optical zoom. 50 FPS Drive, 4K Ultra-HD video, 1/16000-60s Hybrid Shutter, Post-Shot Focus, 4K Live-Cropping, Time-Lapse Video and more. Dual control-dials plus a built-in EVF with Eye-Start sensor.

  • 2016.02.04

  • 2016.02.04

    Canon EOS Rebel T6s Review

    Canon EOS Rebel T6s Review

    Newly designed Rebel with dual control-dials and top status LCD. 24 MP APS-C sensor, Hybrid AF III with 19 all-cross points and on-sensor Phase-Detect AF. 5 FPS Drive and full 1080p HD video capture.

  • 2016.01.05

  • 2016.01.05

    Canon Powershot G3 X Review

    Canon Powershot G3 X Review

    Ultra-zoom with a 25X optical zoom lens and large 20 MP 1" CMOS sensor in a weather-sealed body with dual control-dials, a lens ring and efficient controls. Captures full 1080p HD video at 60 FPS with internal or external stereo sound.

  • 2015.12.19

  • 2015.12.19

    Best Digital Cameras of 2015

    Best Digital Cameras of 2015

    The best new digital cameras of 2015. Plus, find out which ones of 2014 still lead their category. Compact, Premium Cameras, Ultra-Zooms, Mirrorless and DSLR are all covered.

  • 2015.11.30

  • 2015.11.30

    Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 Review

    Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 Review

    16 megapixels Micro Four-Thirds mirrorless. 2.4 MP 0.5" EVF with Eye-Start sensor plus dual control-dials. 4K Ultra-HD video, 8 FPS continuous-drive, hybrid shutter with 1/16000-60s shutter-speeds, ISO 100-25600 and Contrast-Detect DFD autofocus system sensitive to -4 EV.

  • 2015.11.03

  • 2015.11.03

    Nikkor AF-S 200-500mm F/5.6E ED VR Review

    Nikkor AF-S 200-500mm F/5.6E ED VR Review

    Nikon constant-aperture super-telephoto zoom with 200-500mm range and the latest Vibration-Reduction effective to 4.5 stops. Built-in super-sonic AF in a sturdy weatherproof body.