logo
RSS Twitter YouTube

Mastering Digital Panoramic Photography Book Review

Express Summary

Mastering Digital Panoramic Photography is a 151-page soft-cover book by Harald Woeste devoted to teaching panoramic photography using any digital camera. The book covers the subject end-to-end though a variety of contextual information and case studies from the author's professional photography.

Covering panoramic photography from its history to its publication in a relatively short book of general interest means that specific details such as how to use panorama software are limited. General topics like the principles of panoramic photography, how to shoot digital panoramas and printing them are covered to reasonable lengths though.

This book is well illustrated with examples and plenty of figures, showing panoramas, panoramic photography, gear, diagrams and even software screenshots. The accompanying text is an easy read and advances fairly quickly from one topic to the next. The case studies are recounts of very specific panoramic photography projects.

Mastering Digital Panoramic Photography is available for purchase from Amazon.

Book Review

Mastering Digital Panoramic Photography is about exploring the entire topic from its very beginners to modern usage and techniques. Although the word Digital appears in the title, Harald Woeste begins with the history of panoramas which surprisingly started in the 18th century.

The preface of the book is an ideal overview of the book which shows very thoughtful organization in six blocks. The first five blocks each get their own chapter and the sixth takes on the last four chapters, one per case-study. The first chapter, basics includes history lessons, discussion on visual perception and a brilliant explanation of Projections which are essential to rendering panoramas but often misunderstood.

The second chapter is devoted to shooting. This one describes and compares equipment needed to create panoramas as well as how to set and move the camera to capture shots which are most suitable for creating panoramas. Here the book covers in great details different types of panoramic heads and how the compare to each other in practical terms.

The following charpter covers the principles of stitching which gives a thorough understand of what is involved in the process. There is more detail information on projects too, along with wire-frame renderings to visualize how images are distorted to form panoramas. A short chapter on Panorama Software follows. This is the most skimpy chapter in the book with only vague details about each piece of software. They do work rather differently, so putting more software-specific information would make the book require frequent revisions.

There is a quick interlude before the project-oriented charpters. This one showcases beautiful panoramas up to 360° in field-of-view. Some simple long distance shots, interior shots, street panoramas and even the interior of a vehicle. This represent a broad range of what is possible with digital panoramic photography.

The last four chapters cover the detailed workflow of creating a number of panoramas for different commercial purposes. There is a good account of how images were captured, the equipment used, software used and even some post-processing steps along with screenshots of panoramic and image maniupulation software in use. The one disappoiting aspect is that the author describes much more what he did than how. Numbers are often shown in the UI for software but we have no clue as to why these are the required numbers.

Mastering Digital Panoramic Photography is an excellent read for those starting with panoramic photography and those which are struggling with it. What it does extremely well is explain the end-to-end process of creating panoramas. It is easy to appreciate that the author produced custom diagrams to illustrate difficult subjects to grasps such as Projections. After reading the book, it is much easier to understand how the pieces of panoramic photography fit together.

To get started quickly with making your first panorama photo and to learn how modern panorama software compare, visit this panorama photo site. It includes a tutorial and recomendation of state of the art tripods, ball-heads and panoramic heads for most budgets.

Camera Bag

Clear

Your camera bag is empty. To add a camera or lens click on the star next to its name.

Neocamera Blog is a medium for expressing ideas related to digital cameras and photography. Read about digital cameras in the context of technology, media, art and the world. Latest posts links:

Updates

    2014.12.09

  • 2014.12.09

    Fujinon XF50-140mm F/2.8R LM OIS WR Review

    Fujinon XF50-140mm F/2.8R LM OIS WR Review

    Fujinon XF50-140mm F/2.8R LM OIS WR Review added to the Fuji X-T1 Photographer Experience. This is the top-of-the-line X-mount lens with constant maximum aperture in a weathersealed and freezeproof body with built-in optical image-stabilization.

  • 2014.12.06

  • 2014.12.06

    Fuji X-T1 Graphite Hands-On

    Fuji X-T1 Graphite Hands-On

    The Graphite Edition of the excellent Fuji X-T1 adds an ultra-fast electronic-shutter with 1/32000s maximum speed and a number of improvements in a new smooth and highly durable finish.

  • 2014.12.02

  • 2014.12.02

    Nikon D750 Review

    Nikon D750 Review

    The first video-optimized full-frame DSLR features a 24 MP CMOS sensor with ISO 50 - 51200 range, 6.5 FPS and full 1080p HD video at 60 FPS, with stereo sound and AF-tracking. A 100% coverage viewfinder and large 3.2" tilting LCD with 1.2MP allow precise framing.

  • 2014.11.28

  • 2014.11.28

    Best Digital Cameras of 2014

    Best Digital Cameras of 2014

    The best digital cameras of 2014, selected among each class and for various types of photography.

  • 2014.11.11

  • 2014.11.11

    Nikon 1 J4 Review

    Nikon 1 J4 Review

    The smallest Nikon mirrorless packs an 18 MP high-speed CMOS sensor capable of 60 FPS drive and full 1080p HD video at 60 FPS, plus slow-motion video up to 1200 FPS.

  • 2014.10.27

  • 2014.10.27

    Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 Review

    Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 Review

    Uniquely compact mirrorless that features a 16 MP LiveMOS Four-Thirds sensor with ISO 125-25600 range, 1/16000s-60s, 5 FPS drive and full 1080p HD video. Full manual controls and a very complete feature-set.

  • 2014.10.10

  • 2014.10.10

    Fuji X30 Review

    Fuji X30 Review

    Premium compact with a bright 28-112mm F/2-2.8 mechanical-zoom lens and a 12 MP 2/3" X-Trans CMOS II sensor with built-in Phase-Detect AF. Now offers a large 0.65X magnification 2.8 MP 100% coverage EVF with Eye-Start sensor. Dual control-dials and full 1080p HD @ 60 FPS.

  • 2014.09.22

  • 2014.09.22

    Expert Shield Screen Protector Review

    Expert Shield Screen Protector Review

    Expert Shield Screen Protectors offer scratch protection with a crystal clear covering that uses no adhesive.

  • 2014.09.02

  • 2014.09.02

    Canon EOS Rebel T5 Review

    Canon EOS Rebel T5 Review

    Entry-level DSLR with 18 MP, 9-Point Phase-Detect AF, 3 FPS drive and full 1080p HD video in a compact body. The lowest-cost Canon DSLR yet.

  • 2014.08.08

  • 2014.08.08

    Nikon D810 Review

    Nikon D810 Review

    Professional DSLR with anti-alias-filter-free 36 MP CMOS sensor. Ultra-low ISO 32 to 51200. 5 FPS and 1080p @ 60 FPS. Large 0.7X magnification 100% coverage OVF. All new processing-pipeline and Highlight-Weighed metering.